Campanula rotundifolia, Harebell, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

$5.00

33 in stock

Campanula rotundifolia, Harebell, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

There is a  required minimum purchase of 5 individual plant plugs for this species.  There are 50 individual plant plugs of this species in a tray.

Wholesale pricing is based on quantity. The cost PER individual plant is:

5 or more $5.00 each
25 or more $2.50 each
50 or more $1.50 each

For Shipping, Planting and additional FAQ’s please see “About our organically grown native plug trays “.

See all available Native Perennial Grasses &  Organically Grown Plug Trays

Order Minimum

There is a minimum order total of $150.00.

Total for all items combined before tax (VA residents only) and Shipping.

Description

Campanula rotundifolia, Harebell, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

Attractive Flowers:
Average – Dry soil:
Average to moist soil:
Average Wildlife Value:
Beneficial Insects:
Butterflies:
Drought Tolerant:
Drought tolerant:
Dry-Moist Soil:
Full – Part Sun (6+ hours of sun):
Herbaceous plant:
Hummingbirds:
Moist Soil:
Native To Mountain Regions:
Native to Piedmont Regions:
Part Sun – Part Shade :
Perennial:
Pollinator support:
Sandy soil, coarse texture:
Songbirds:
Status not yet determined- :
Threatened / Endangered:
Full Sun:
ic Name (s): Campanula rotundifolia

Common Name(s): Harebell, Bluebell Bellflower

Mature height :1-3ft

Mature spread:1-3ft

Flower Color:Blue, purple

Plant Characteristics
Duration: Perennial
Habit: Herb
Flower:
Fruit:
Size Class: 1-3 ft.
Bloom Information
Bloom Color: Blue , Purple
Bloom Time: Jun , Jul , Aug , Sep
Distribution
USA: AK , AZ , CA , CO , CT , IA , ID , IL , IN , MA , MD , ME , MI , MN , MO , MT , NC , ND , NE , NH , NJ , NM , NY , OH , OR , PA , SD , TN , TX , UT , VA , VT , WA , WI , WV , WY
Canada: AB , BC , MB , NB , NL , NS , ON , QC , SK
Native Distribution: Temperate Eurasia and North America, from Europe east to Siberia and Canada, s. to MD, n. IN, n.e. IA, NE & n. CA; also s. in mts. to TX & northeastern Mex.
Native Habitat: Moist, rocky, mt. slopes; dry meadows & prairies; open woods; limey cliffs; beaches
Growing Conditions
Light Requirement: Sun , Part Shade , Shade
Soil Moisture: Dry
Soil Description: Sandy, well-drained soils.
Conditions Comments: Harebell is easily cultured and does well in a variety of sites including rock gardens. Flowers are long lasting.
Benefit
Use Wildlife: Hummingbirds
Conspicuous Flowers: yes
Attracts: Hummingbirds

Campanula rotundifolia, Harebell, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia L.)
By Patricia J. Ruta McGhan USFS

Harebell, often called “bluebell”, is a flower found around the world in the Northern Hemisphere but most often, associated with Scotland. Harebell has many common names including bellflower, lady’s thimble, witch’s thimble, heathbells, fairies’ thimbles, and dead men’s bells.

Harebell grows in a variety of habitats ranging from full sun to shade; dry to moderate moisture; woods, meadows, cliffs, and beaches; in sandy, gravely soil. It can be found at elevations up to 12,000 feet in the Western United States.

Harebell flowers in the summer and fall. Its stem leaves are narrow and grass like, but the basal leaves are rather round, hence the specific name rotundifolia. The narrow, wiry stem averages about a foot tall, while the thin, papery flowers are usually about an inch long. The plant has a milky sap when the stem or leaves are broken. The plants are much hardier than they look.

Bees primarily pollinate harebell although it is capable of self-fertilization. Harebell seeds are extremely small, but can be collected for propagation and then sown directly on the soil in the spring. Clumps of harebell can also be divided in either spring or fall.

Harebell was formerly used in the manufacture of blue dye for tartans and is the symbol of the MacDonald clan. The common name of harebell alludes to the folk beliefs that it either grew in places frequented by hares or that witches used juices squeezed from this flower to transform themselves into hares. The Haida Indians of the Pacific Northwest called them “blue rain flowers” and it was thought that picking them would cause it to rain. In Europe the leaves are sometimes eaten raw in salad and the plant is thought to have minor medicinal qualities.

See all organically grown native Wildflowers & Pollinator Support Plants