Chamaenerion angustifolium, Native Fireweed, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Wholesale Native Plugs

$6.00

100 in stock

Chamaenerion angustifolium, Native Fireweed, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

There is a  required minimum purchase of 5 individual plant plugs for this species.  There are 50 individual plant plugs of this species in a tray.

Wholesale pricing is based on quantity. The cost PER individual plant is:

5 or more $6.00 each
25 or more $3.00 each
50 or more $2.00 each

For Shipping, Planting and additional FAQ’s please see “About our organically grown native plug trays “.

See all available Native Perennial Grasses &  Organically Grown Plug Trays

Order Minimum

There is a minimum order total of $150.00.

Total for all items combined before tax (VA residents only) and Shipping.

Description

Chamaenerion angustifolium, Native Fireweed, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium
Chamerion angustifolium (L.) Holub ssp. angustifolium
Fireweed, Narrow-leaf Fireweed, Willow Herb
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)
Synonym(s): Chamaenerion angustifolium, Chamerion angustifolium var. angustifolium, Chamerion spicatum, Epilobium angustifolium, Epilobium angustifolium var. intermedium, Epilobium spicatum
USDA Symbol: chana2
USDA Native Status: L48 (N), AK (N), CAN (N), GL (N)
Narrow-leaf fireweed is a showy, clumped perennial, commonly growing 3-5 ft. tall. The erect stems are usually reddish, have numerous elongate, alternate leaves, and end in a tapering spike of rosy-purple flowers. Flowers have four petals and are 1 in. across. The seeds, which are windborne by a tuft of hairs, are produced in slender pods that open from the top downward.
Duration: Perennial
Habit: Herb
Leaf: Green
Flower:
Size Class: 3-6 ft.
Bloom Information
Bloom Color: White , Pink , Purple
Bloom Time: Jun , Jul , Aug
Distribution
USA: AK , MT , WA , WY
Canada: BC , NB , NL , NS , ON , PE , QC , SK , YT
Native Distribution: AK & sub-artic Canada, s. to MD, mts. to NC & TN, n. OH, n.e. IA, Black Hills, NM & CA
Native Habitat: Dry clearings; burned woodlands; roadsides; low, wet places
Growing Conditions
Water Use: High
Light Requirement: Sun
Soil Moisture: Moist
Soil pH: Circumneutral (pH 6.8-7.2)
CaCO3 Tolerance: Medium
Soil Description: Well-drained, moist to dry soils.
Conditions Comments: It derives its name from the fact that it quickly invades burned out forests to form dense masses of color. This plant must have sun.
Benefit
Use Wildlife: Butterflies, Bees
Use Food: Older stems have been split lengthwise to scrape out the soft, edible centre (pith) and to prepare the tough stem fibres for making them into twine and fishnets. (Kershaw). The very young shoots and leaves can be eaten as cooked greens. (Niering)
Conspicuous Flowers: yes

Chamaenerion angustifolium is a perennial herbaceous flowering plant in the willowherb family Onagraceae. It is known in North America as fireweed, in some parts of Canada as great willowherb, in Britain and Ireland as rosebay willowherb.

USDA:

Reclamation: Fireweed shows great potential for use in
forest reclamation as it is capable of germinating and
growing on reclaimed soils. It is effective in taking up
nutrients from the soil, promoting nutrient capture,
accumulation, and likely nutrient cycling on newly
reclaimed sites.

Ethnobotany
Fireweed has been utilized in several ways by Native
Americans and First Nations People. Many sought out
fireweed plants in the spring-time before they bloomed, to
eat the sweet and succulent raw pith of the stems. Some
boiled or steamed the stems and served them like
asparagus, some used the leafy stems as flavoring or as
matting in root-cooking pits or earth ovens (Turner 1997).
In England and Russia the leaves were used as a substitute
for, or an additive to, tea. In Russia it is still used for this
purpose; the beverage is called “Kaporie tea” (Mitich
1999).It may have a laxative effect (Parish et al.1996).
Fireweed was used by Interior Peoples (Canadian First
Nations People) externally as a medicine against eczema,
and they sometimes mixed it with other plants. Coastal
First Nations People dried stems peelings and twisted
them into a type of twine used for fishing nets. Some
mixed the seed fluff with hair from mountain goats or
dogs and used it for weaving or padding (Parish et al.
1996). Extracts of fireweed reduce PG (prostaglandin)
biosynthesis and exert anti-inflammatory effects (Juan et
al. 1988). More recently, Japanese-Canadians and others
have adopted fireweed as a green vegetable (Turner
1997).

Chamaenerion angustifolium, Native Fireweed, Organically Grown Native Perennial Plugs, Native Wildflowers, Native Pollinator Support Plants

See all organically grown native Wildflowers & Pollinator Support Plants